Advertiser Disclosure
X

Advertiser Disclosure: The credit card and banking offers that appear on this site are from credit card companies and banks from which MoneyCrashers.com receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site, including, for example, the order in which they appear on category pages. MoneyCrashers.com does not include all banks, credit card companies or all available credit card offers, although best efforts are made to include a comprehensive list of offers regardless of compensation. Advertiser partners include American Express, Chase, U.S. Bank, and Barclaycard, among others.

  • Date

By

Dig Deeper

27,216FansLike
27,745FollowersFollow
43,449FollowersFollow

Become a Money Crasher!
Join our community.

Sales Tax Holidays by State – Schedule for 2021 Year

You can’t take a holiday from paying federal income taxes, but you might be able to take a break from paying sales tax, depending on where you live.

A sales tax holiday is a period when a state (and sometimes local) government waives or reduces sales tax on certain goods for a limited time — usually a week or weekend. These holidays have become an annual event in many states, and they often revolve around certain seasons, such as back-to-school shopping or hurricane preparedness.

In America, 18 states and Puerto Rico announced tax holidays for 2021. Does your state have a sales tax holiday?

Sales Tax Holidays by State

No two state tax holidays are alike. Scan the list to find out whether your state offers one or more sales tax holidays, which merchandise qualifies for an exemption, and essential dates and limits. There’s also a link to learn more via each state’s department of revenue or taxation.

Pro tip: Download the Ibotta app and you’ll earn cash back at select retailers. For a limited time, Ibotta is also offering a $20 bonus for new accounts. Learn more about Ibotta.

Alabama Annual Severe Weather Tax-Free Weekend (Feb. 26 – 28, 2021)

Some counties and municipalities waive sales tax on severe weather preparedness products costing $60 or less or generators and power cords costing $1,000 or less.

Get full details at the Alabama Department of Revenue.

Alabama Annual Back-to-School Holiday (July 16 – 18, 2021)

Some counties and municipalities waive sales tax on clothing ($100 or less per garment), computers and software ($750 or less), noncommercial school supplies ($50 or less per product), and noncommercial purchases of books ($30 or less per book) in participating communities.

Get full details at the Alabama Department of Revenue.

Arkansas Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 7 – 8, 2021)

Retailers waive state and local sales tax on clothing and footwear (less than $100 per garment), clothing accessories and equipment (less than $50 per product), school supplies, art supplies, and school instructional materials.

Get full details at the Arkansas Department of Finance and Administration.

Connecticut Annual Sales Tax-Free Week (Aug. 15 – 21, 2021)

Retail purchases of most clothing and footwear under $100 are exempt from sales and use tax.

Get full details at the Connecticut State Department of Revenue Services.

Florida Severe Weather Holiday (May 28 – June 6, 2021)

Certain supplies related to disaster preparedness are exempt from sales tax.

Get full details at the Florida Department of Revenue.

Florida Freedom Week Sales Tax Holiday (July 1 – 7, 2021)

Purchases of qualifying recreation and outdoor products and tickets to entertainment and cultural events are exempt from sales tax.

Get full details at the Florida Department of Revenue.

Florida Back-to-School Holiday (July 31 – Aug. 9, 2021)

Retailers can choose not to collect sales tax on certain goods, including school supplies ($15 or less per product); clothing, footwear, and accessories ($60 or less per garment); and the first $1,000 of personal computers and peripheral devices.

Get full details at the Florida Department of Revenue.

Iowa Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 7, 2021)

Retailers do not collect sales tax on clothing and footwear priced less than $100 per garment (excluding accessories).

Get full details at the Iowa Department of Revenue.

Maryland Annual Energy Star Holiday (Feb. 13 – 15, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on sales of Energy Star products, including air conditioners, washers, dryers, furnaces, heat pumps, refrigerators, compact fluorescent lightbulbs, LED lightbulbs, dehumidifiers, programmable thermostats, and solar water heaters.

Get full details at the Comptroller of Maryland website.

Maryland Annual Back-to-School Tax-Free Week (Aug. 8 – 14, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing and footwear ($100 or less per garment).

Get full details at the Comptroller of Maryland website.

Massachusetts Annual Sales Tax Holiday (Aug. 14 – 15, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on nonbusiness retail sales of personal property costing $2,500 or less.

Get full details at the Massachusetts Department of Revenue.

Mississippi Annual Back-to-School Sales Tax Holiday (July 30 – 31, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing, footwear, or school supplies costing less than $100 each.

Get full details at the Mississippi Department of Revenue.

Mississippi Annual Second Amendment Holiday (Aug. 27 – 29, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on retail sales of firearms, ammunition, and hunting supplies.

Get full details at the Mississippi Department of Revenue.

Missouri Show Me Green Sales Tax Holiday (April 19 – 25, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on retail sales of qualifying Energy Star appliances up to $1,500 per appliance.

Get full details at the Missouri Department of Revenue.

Missouri Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing ($100 or less per garment), school supplies ($50 or less per product), computer software ($350 or less per program or bundle), computers or peripherals ($1,500 or less per device), and graphing calculators ($150 or less per calculator).

Get full details at the Missouri Department of Revenue.

New Mexico Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

Retailers can choose to waive sales tax on clothing and footwear (less than $100 per garment); school supplies (less than $30 per product); computers and tablets (up to $1,000 per device); computer-related items ($500 or less each); book bags, backpacks, maps and globes (less than $100 each); and handheld calculators (less than $200 per calculator).

Get full details at the Sales Tax Handbook.

Ohio Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing priced at $75 or less or school supplies and instructional materials priced at $20 or less.

Get full details at the Ohio Department of Taxation.

Oklahoma Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

Retailers cannot collect sales tax on clothing and footwear priced at less than $100 per garment.

Get full details at the Oklahoma Tax Commission.

Puerto Rico Annual Back-to-School Holiday (July 16 – 17, 2021 and Jan. 7 – 8, 2022)

Puerto Rico does not collect sales tax on school uniforms and school supplies and materials.

Get full details at the Puerto Rico Department of Finance.

South Carolina Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing and accessories, footwear, school supplies, computers, printers, software, and certain bed and bath items.

Get full details at the South Carolina Department of Revenue.

Tennessee Annual Back-to-School Holiday (July 30 – Aug. 1, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing, school supplies, or art supplies priced at $100 or less or electronic devices priced at $1,500 or less.

Get full details at the Tennessee Department of Revenue.

Tennessee Food, Food Ingredients, and Prepared Food Sales Tax Holiday (July 30 – Aug. 5, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on food, food ingredients, or prepared food, including sales at restaurants, food trucks, caterers, and grocery stores.

Get full details at the Tennessee Department of Revenue.

Tennessee Gun Safes and Safety Equipment Sales Tax Holiday (July 1 – June 30, 2022)

The state does not collect sales and use tax on qualified gun sales and gun safety devices.

Get full details at the Tennessee Department of Revenue.

Texas Annual Severe Weather Holiday (April 24 – 26, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on retail sales of portable generators (less than $3,000 per generator), hurricane shelters and emergency ladders (less than $300 per item), and other emergency preparation supplies (less than $75 per item).

Get full details at the Texas Comptroller’s website.

Texas Energy Star Sales Tax Holiday (May 29 – 31, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on certain Energy Star-qualified appliances and water-saving products.

Get full details at the Texas Comptroller’s website.

Texas Annual Back-to-School Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing, footwear, backpacks, and most school supplies priced at less than $100 per product.

Get full details at the Texas Comptroller’s website.

Virginia Annual Sales Tax Holiday (Aug. 6 – 8, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on Energy Star- and WaterSense-qualified products, clothing and footwear, school supplies, portable generators, gas-powered chainsaws and accessories, and other hurricane preparedness items.

Get full details at Virginia Tax.

West Virginia Back-to-School Holiday (July 30 – Aug. 2, 2021)

The state does not collect sales tax on clothing, school supplies, instruction materials, laptops and tablets, and sports equipment.

Get full details at the West Virginia State Tax Department.


Final Word

Some states, including Alaska, Delaware, Montana, New Hampshire, and Oregon, have no state sales tax at all. If you live in a neighboring state, you can give yourself a tax-free holiday any time you want by crossing state lines to shop for back-to-school, major gift-giving holidays, or big-ticket items.

Also, while you might not have to pay state sales taxes, you could still owe county and city sales taxes. Still, depending on where you shop and how much you plan to spend, the savings from forgoing that state sales tax hit can really add up.

Janet Berry-Johnson
Janet Berry-Johnson is a Certified Public Accountant. Before leaving the accounting world to focus on freelance writing, she specialized in income tax consulting and compliance for individuals and small businesses. She lives in Omaha, Nebraska with her husband and son and their rescue dog, Dexter.

What Do You Want To Do
With Your Money?

Make
Money

Explore

Manage
Money

Explore

Save
Money

Explore

Borrow
Money

Explore

Protect
Money

Explore

Invest
Money

Explore