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Work From Home Scams List – 5 Fake Illegitimate Jobs & Opportunities to Avoid

By Suzanne Kearns

computer hacker scam

Telecommuting and virtual offices are becoming more popular, but unfortunately, unemployment and underemployment are still very common as well. With the two worlds colliding, people looking for work or extra cash are becoming increasingly vulnerable to work from home scams and get rich quick schemes.

When trends like these emerge, new scams surface to take advantage of people — trying to rob you while you’re just trying to make a living. You might think you’re smart enough to detect obvious scams and ignore them, but schemers have mastered manipulation techniques. They know exactly what to say to victims to get in your pockets. By staying on top of the latest specific scams and signals, you can stay out of trouble.

5 Common Fraudulent Offers

Don’t get caught in the traps of work from home scams designed to take your money and leave you to blame in the eyes of the law. These top five job descriptions are almost always signs of fraud.

1. Package Forwarding
This con hurts victims twice over. Its artists will cheat targets out of their own money, and then bring the police to the door to question a suspect, not help a victim.

A thief will steal your credit card (as many identity theft victim stories begin) and use it to purchase goods. The thief knows that he can’t ship them to his own address without attracting attention, so he sets up phony ads on Craigslist and other online boards promising payments for forwarding packages, often under the guise of helping a neighbor who’s traveling or an overstocked business.

The scam victims then receive the package, along with instructions on where to send the package next. After re-mailing the stolen goods — with your own money — you’ll supposedly get a check for your services. Sometimes payment comes, and sometimes it doesn’t. In either event, it’s usually the police who show up wanting to know why you received stolen goods at their own address. Try explaining that one.

2. Email Forwarding
This hustle puts a modern spin on the old envelope-stuffing scheme, which surprisingly still finds victims today.

You’ll get an invitation or job offer to make money by forwarding emails on behalf of a company. On the surface, it might look like a marketing job or entry-level position in online media. You’d think it’s easy to see through a scam like this from the beginning, but for someone desperate for work, it’s easy to miss some warning signs.

The “company” informs you that to get started, you just need to submit a fee for materials or software you’ll need. Once the cheats have the cash, however, they’ll either never send the materials, or even worse, the “material” is just a letter that tells you how to run the same scam on other unsuspecting potential victims.

3. Work in Crafts
This hoax is another one that’s been around so long it’s a wonder that it has any victims left. But it does, and people are losing thousands of dollars to it.

Instigators begin by advertising online or in print media, announcing a search for workers who can assemble crafts or other items for them. They promise payment on a per-piece basis, saying that they only accept high quality goods, and that workers will have to purchase top-notch sewing machines and other equipment from them. The investment is worth it, they say, because the piecemeal work they do will quickly have the equipment paying for itself.

Of course, these specific machines can only be bought from the craft company, and soon the checks and credit card orders start rolling in. After targets have spent thousands of dollars, the “company” simply closes up, the scammers pocket the cash, and the victims never hear another word.

Alternatively, some advanced con artists, knowing that people may be wise to the scam, will go so far as to send some equipment out. In this longer game, they reject all of the crafts the victims send on the grounds that the products don’t meet standards. Duped, the would-be craft workers never see a dime and may not even realize they’ve been tricked.

4. Incoming Jobs
Especially in this market, the “You’ve got a job!” scam is gaining ground. In this one, unsuspecting victims receive an email with the good news that a job offer awaits them at a certain website that has more information. Following the link, they see instructions to enter their mailing address and other personal information for permission to see if jobs are still available. Surprise! They still qualify, but only two jobs remain, and they need to quickly claim one before another applicant else gets it.

To claim the role, they’ll need to provide more personal information, including valid credit card data. “Why do I need to provide a potential employer with my credit card number?” a desperate job seeker may ask. And the cons have an answer: For job training of course! This particular (mandatory) training will cost, say, $200, and the job starts after successful completion of training. In the end, there’s no training, no job, and the victim gave up $200 – and a credit card number. This can potentially open you up to identity theft and separate credit card fraud and scams.

5. Data Entry
While there are plenty of legitimate data entry jobs, there are also a lot of sham employers who exist only to bilk work-from-homers out of thousands of dollars. They’ll post a job for data processors who can work from home. When an applicant contacts them, they put them through an interview and make a job offer.

But wait, all employees must use specific software to work on their system. The applicant doesn’t have it (no one does) because it’s only made by the company, who then sells it for thousands of dollars – yes, really. Applicants are happy enough to have the chance to work from home, so they bite on the offer. As with similar scams, the job seeker has just spent thousands, and, not surprisingly, after the check clears, the data entry job never materializes.

4 Scam Signals

Knowing common specific scams is a start, but how can you stay ahead of innovative criminals? A lousy job market creates a ripe pool of targets for scams, since so many people are struggling to earn an honest buck. If you notice one of these four characteristics in an offer, you’re probably looking at scam bait:

1. Overseas Company
This should usually be a deal breaker for any income-earning online job. How can you work for a company that holds an ambiguous address or doesn’t even have a phone number to call? When you see an address from an obscure country name, the red flags should go up. If you can’t call or email your supposed employer directly, move on!

2. Absurd Offers
Online scams typically try to sell you the dream lifestyle: laying on the beach all day in Cancun surrounded by dozens of beautiful women while you generate hundreds of dollars a day of passive income. Who doesn’t love passive income opportunities? Who doesn’t enjoy the beach? Who doesn’t love beautiful women? Is it too good to be true? Absolutely. It’s always too good to be true. The more absurd the offer, the higher are the odds that it’s a big fat work from home scam.

3. Vague Payment Structure
The payment plans with these get rich quick plans are typically poorly defined. You need to completely understand how you’ll be paid. Will you get paid biweekly? Will you get paid monthly? How will you file your taxes? These are all basic payment issues that you need to address.

4. Heavy Upfront Financial Investment
You have to invest a boatload of money for an income-generating opportunity. A couple of hundred dollars upfront or a long-term commitment to an ambiguous work from home business on the Internet is always a poor choice.

Recent Get Rich Quick Scheme

A recent high-profile and frightening example that should act as your reminder to always be on your toes is marketed as Goog Cash4u, also known as Internet Wealth Builder.

Around September of 2009, this get rich quick scheme hit the Internet market quickly and affected a lot of unsuspecting people.

The “company” promised that individuals could make anywhere from $250-943 a day. “Wow! Sign me up,” plenty of people thought. Unfortunately, there were many obvious flaws with this plan.

Among other things, their payment plan was the real killer. Participants had to pay $1.97 for their “free trial kit” (this was just to cover the shipping costs of course). After the seven-day trial was over, they would automatically charge $69.97 per month to remain a part of the service as well as an additional $29.95 per month for “alternative funding.”

Unfortunately, all of these schemes find their victims. One reader emailed me and explained to me how he was a victim of this get rich quick scheme. This individual had just lost his job and was highly vulnerable. He needed to earn money to pay the bills. He thought that he has found his solution. What he got instead was a big fat scam.

Final Word

Con artists spend hours trying to figure out how to cheat people out of their money, and they know that by appealing to the human tendency to get something for free — or in this case, earn a lot of money by not doing much — they’ll always have victims.

There are valid ways to make money from home, but most of them will require lots of hard work. You simply won’t be able to make $10,000 per week doing them. I’m just pretty sure that nobody will ever offer you lots of money without you having to put in a lot of time and effort.

Please be very skeptical of any plan that ever uses the terms “guaranteed” and “lots of money” in the same sentence. The only people getting rich are the ones selling these plans! Don’t give up your search, but be smart about it. Work on making yourself more marketable in the job market and know where to look for a job.

Have you spotted a tempting work from home scam? Share your warnings and cautionary tales in the comments below.

(photo credit: Shutterstock)

Suzanne Kearns
Suzanne lives in Texas and has been a full-time freelance writer for 20 years. She’s written for numerous business and financial publications, both online and in traditional print media. She also owns her own small business and has a passion to help others achieve their dreams of financial independence. Her goal is to eventually work from a remote island that is equipped with Wi-Fi.

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  • http://onlinejobadvice.com Kristy

    Hi There! My name is Kristy and I have worked from home for the last 6 years doing medical transcription and speech recognition editing for a national company. I am presently working on government accounts only. I have also had an internet store and I am presently doing affiliate marketing. I am here to tell you that work-from-home scams do exist because I have been scammed myself. I chose to move on from it and make my goal of working from home a reality instead of getting down from one company who took my $79. I never got scammed again after that. I learned from my mistakes. I currently have a website that offers a free 10-part mini course on where to look for legitimate online work and how to avoid getting scammed. Please visit and sign up for the mini course. There is no cost to you and it could be of real benefit for you on your search for online work. Best Wishes!

    • Suzanne

      Thank you for your story, Kristy. You can also get tons more information by typing “work from home scams” into our search feature. It’s amazing to read about what lengths scammers will go to!

      • 2009miranda

        has anyone heard of worldwide mail forwarding?

        • aljohn

          Mail forwarding is a scam My brother-in-law was arrested because the company he worked for had him forwarding stolen electronics. He spoke with some via internet and phone and he received payment everyday but never questioned why they needed him to forward the items when you have a family to feed I guess you take those risk but the money he paid to get out of jail and the time lost with his family was not worth it

        • doghouse

          STAY AWAY FLAT OUT SCAM.

    • Rustom C. Chothia

      Dear Kristy,
      I am interested in your 10 part mini course,Please send me full details,
      (I have been scammed enough since last 2 years)
      Have yet to find something that works.
      My address is
      Thank you and God Bless.
      Rustom.

    • Islandgirl60

      Dear Kristy,
      I have recently had some bad medical issues which has caused me to be out of work since Jan of this year. I has searched for online jobs. no luck. I am intereted in some information if you could help. Thank you. email is [email protected] Have a great day.

      • Name

        I have a research position available ASAP. Must be willing to relocate at own expense. Excellent phone etiquette is required. Computer literacy is also a requirement.

  • CARLA

    I CURRENTLY WORK A FULL TIME JOB. I HAVE 2 CHILDREN,AND LIVE CHECK TO CHECK. I WOULD LIKE TO FIND SOMETHING I CAN DO FROM HOME VIA THE INTERNET,BUT I AM VERY AFFRAID OF SCAMS.CANT AFFORD TO LOOSE ANY MONEY. EVERY PENNY COUNTS RIGHT NOW. WHAT TO DO ?

    • Suzanne Kearns

      Hi Carla,

      Check out this article on our site for a list of 5 real work from jobs: http://www.moneycrashers.com/ways-make-money-from-home/ .

      You’re right–you do have to be careful, but with good research and a healthy skepticism, you can find jobs that will allow you to work from home and make some extra income. Keep checking the site as we’ll publish more and more on this topic.

      Good luck to you, and don’t give up!

      Suzanne

  • Guera

    Kristi,
    I would love to know the website to your mini course on working from home.

  • Danaalder52

    Because of a medical issue,my employer thought it best to restructure my department, leaving me with out a job. I have been looking for ways to make a income working from home. We desperately need the money! I have looked at several “Work From Home” web sites that all have limited offer and or 50% off if I join by a curtain date. I have also experienced some that need my Name, Phone number and State to see if there are any openings left in my area. Like many, I am not sure, who is legitimate or scam, and i cannot afford to take a risk.. Is there somewhere i can check to is who is real and who is scam?

  • Anonymous

    I’m sorry that you lost your job–it seems that’s happening more and more in this economy. The good news is that with a little drive and research, you can find work from home jobs. I don’t know of one place where you can check for scams, other than typing the company’s name into a search engine and seeing what comes up, but you can look for warning signs, and if you see them, move on. In your post, you say that some of these sites are offering you 50% off–real jobs never charge you to work. I would say avoid those, and keep looking!

    Good luck,

    Suzanne

  • sarahb

    When all is said and done, are there any “work from home” jobs that are NOT scams? I’ve done alot of network marketing businesses. While they aren’t necessarily “scams”, I don’t care to much for their “ambush” sales approach most of them use. I was once offered a job in transcription, but I had to buy the software to train for it. While I’m aware that transcription training isn’t free, I was wary of giving the company money for software I may never get. I look at endless lists of “at home work” businesses but I’m to scared to try any of them for fear of getting scammed.

  • Jimmy

    Dear Sir,

    I received an e-mail this morning, the title of the business is FREEDOMSOFT.

    Have any one of you heard of this software?

  • Biguysamaon2588

    I received a package forwarding job offer from a company named Taylor Goods Delivery that’s address is in Copenhagen, Denmark? Anybody heard of anything like this?

    • Jellycards

      I wish i saw this prior i worked a month for them and now when it comes time for payment they wont answer calls or emails i just googled them and another person also got scammed late last year

  • http://businessanalystcertification365.com/ Business Analyst Certification

    Knowledge and experience are main. So we should always try to be updated for avoiding scams job.

  • Margaret Donaldson

    I’ve been scammed out of over $20,000 by My Essential Plans, The Tax Club, All Access Books, Ikongo and Go Go Dropshippers. They work together and charge your credit cards with a promise to get you up and running in an e-commerce business.
    Once they tap out your credit cards they will try to get you to give them your banking information, or perhaps refinance your home. When I refused they laughed at me and hung up. To this date I have received NOTHING. NO SERVICES. NOTHING. (except an e-library on how to buy/sell on e-bay). This is not what they tell you that you are buying. I already knew how to do that and told them so when I saw what it was that they sent. By then it is too late. The charges have already been made, as the minute you pay My Essential Plans you are unindated with very aggressive people telling you that you are holding everything up!!! They bully you into making more charges with the promise that you will make your start up costs within 30 days.
    I am left to prove to my credit card company that I didn’t receive anything, while the thieves forward copies of e-signatures that they force you to sign after the first charge(which you are told will be the total cost).
    They are clever enough to make all transactions over the phone and insist that without these necessary charges your business will fail.
    Many of us have been in contact through various complaint sites. Together we are trying to expose these companies for the frauds that they are. In the meantime we are left financally strapped and our days/nights are consumed with written correspondence back and forth with the credit card companies. I guess they think we will eventually give up. Boy were they wrong. The amount of people joining this group is growing at a rapid speed. Together we will prove it is all a scam….

    • Dijonay

      With all due respect, Margaret, but, how or why did you allow this company to scam you out of so much money?

      I’m just curious.

  • Harrisire

    Hello,
    Just to chime in here, I have been working various jobs on oDesk. Not trying to promote them, but there are tons of jobs advertised there and, as most of you have mentioned, I cannot work out of the home at this time. Check out oDesk. You might find something you can do for actual money.

  • aljohn

    Has anyone heard of Freedom Soft, Real Estate Match Maker offered by Preston Ely out of Tampa Florida

  • Roger A. Anspach

    Has anyone heard of Kristina Smith, [email protected]? I received an offer for a customer service position as an assistant manager. The company that I would be working for is PLS-Company in Melbourne, Australia. They are supposedly in the software business. I was surprised that they do have a web site and a client list. When I pursued the details of this offer, I was assured that the position was home-based, and after a training period of two weeks, I would receive $1500 and then I would be compensated at the rate of $4500 per month. After numerous emails back and forth, I received an email that stated that a contract and work agreement were attached and that I was to scan the contract , sign the first and last pages, and email them back to her (Kristina Smith). I returned an email to her indicating that there were no attachments, and since then, I have asked that she contact me via telephone to clear up this matter. Since the last email, there has been no other correspondence. I’d like to find out if this is legitimate and where do I go from here?

    • Sack01p

      John C Fronsack
      I have receive the same type of EMAIL and I am just as concerned as you are about this being a SCAM. I too would like to find out if this is legitimate and what to do from here.

      • Sack01p

        I email Kristina Smith for more information and they gave the following PLS Company, 424 Collins Street, Melbourne, Victoria, 3000, Australia
        I talked to a Recruiter company and relayed the information to them, they seem to think this was very fishy especially opening a personal account. They also recommended getting in touch with local law enforcement Cyber Crime.

    • cassandra

      IV HEARD OF KRISTINA SMITH!! SHE SENT ME A JOB OFFER AS AN ASSISTANT MANAGER TOO!! ONLY SHE TOLD ME ID GET 1800 FOR THE FIRST TWO WEEKS TRAINING AND IF SHE LIKED ME ID GET A BASE PAY OF 4500 A MONTH. I ASKED ALOT OF QUESTIONS TOO AND SHE SAID THAT WE WOULD GET PAID BI-WEEKLY,THEN I ASKED IF I HAD TO PAY FOR ANYTHING AT ALL EVER, AND SHE SAID NO THAT SHE DIDNT WANT MY MONEY ALSO THAT THEY OFFER PAID VACATION AND 401 K PLAN AND ALL THIS GOOD STUFF. I HAD ALREADY SIGHNED THE CONTRACT AND SCANNED IT BACK THEN SHE ASKED FOR THE BASIC INFORMATION OF MY BANK ACCOUNT TO WIRE THE MONEY TO MY ACCOUNT ONCE IV FINISHED THE TASKS ALSO THAT I WAS GONNA GET THEIR COMPANY BANK ACCOUNT WEBSITE TOO TO DO MY WORK,IM ASSUMING ITS FOR COLLECTING PAYMENTS OR SOMTHING,BUT ANYWAY IV BEEN TRYNA GET HOLD OF HER AND IV BEEN SAYING THAT THE MAIL IM TRYNA SEND HER IS DELAYING BUT BEFORE THAT WHEN I HAD MY YAHOO IT WOULDNT GO THROUGH BECAUSE SOMONE WAS TRYNA HACK MY YAHOO,I JUST THINK ITS ODD THAT I CANT GET HOLD OF HER NO MORE,ALTHOUGH IT DID SOUND LIKE A GRAT AT HOME JOB OFFER. SHE HAD ALSO TOLD ME THAT IF SHE DIDNT RESPOND TO ME NOT TO WORRY BECAUSE SHES ALWAYS BUSY IN THE OFFICE. THE COMPANY WAS CALLED (PLS) COMPANY (PROGRAM LOGICAL SYSTEMS) THATS WHAT SHE TOLD ME.

    • Otkbunny

      Hello Roger, This is a scam. I’ve already been through the ringer with one such BS nightmare. There is no legitimate work available from this pretend company. You will never get a check and you will be helping them steal.

    • doghouse

      WATCH OUT PROBABLY A SCAM DO NOT DO IT.

  • Denicewroe

    Why are sketchy “Work” from Home websites featured in this beware-of-work-at-home website? I sense that this is a ploy to actually get people involved in this modern fraud.

  • cassandra

    IV HEARD OF KRISTINA SMITH!! SHE SENT ME A JOB OFFER AS AN ASSISTANT MANAGER TOO!! ONLY SHE TOLD ME ID GET 1800 FOR THE FIRST TWO WEEKS TRAINING AND IF SHE LIKED ME ID GET A BASE PAY OF 4500 A MONTH. I ASKED ALOT OF QUESTIONS TOO AND SHE SAID THAT WE WOULD GET PAID BI-WEEKLY,THEN I ASKED IF I HAD TO PAY FOR ANYTHING AT ALL EVER, AND SHE SAID NO THAT SHE DIDNT WANT MY MONEY ALSO THAT THEY OFFER PAID VACATION AND 401 K PLAN AND ALL THIS GOOD STUFF. I HAD ALREADY SIGHNED THE CONTRACT AND SCANNED IT BACK THEN SHE ASKED FOR THE BASIC INFORMATION OF MY BANK ACCOUNT TO WIRE THE MONEY TO MY ACCOUNT ONCE IV FINISHED THE TASKS ALSO THAT I WAS GONNA GET THEIR COMPANY BANK ACCOUNT WEBSITE TOO TO DO MY WORK,IM ASSUMING ITS FOR COLLECTING PAYMENTS OR SOMTHING,BUT ANYWAY IV BEEN TRYNA GET HOLD OF HER AND IV BEEN SAYING THAT THE MAIL IM TRYNA SEND HER IS DELAYING BUT BEFORE THAT WHEN I HAD MY YAHOO IT WOULDNT GO THROUGH BECAUSE SOMONE WAS TRYNA HACK MY YAHOO,I JUST THINK ITS ODD THAT I CANT GET HOLD OF HER NO MORE,ALTHOUGH IT DID SOUND LIKE A GRAT AT HOME JOB OFFER. SHE HAD ALSO TOLD ME THAT IF SHE DIDNT RESPOND TO ME NOT TO WORRY BECAUSE SHES ALWAYS BUSY IN THE OFFICE.

  • Milatbrahim

    Very informatif articles …
    Thank you…

  • Lsinks

    Internet Income Source $97.00 to get access to ther “Grate” offer then after you talk with a Member, they need another $200.00 to get started after a meeting with there Money making guru. Stay away, I’m a unemployed man who was in need of money since the job market is crap almost feel into it big time.

  • sandi

    has anyone heard of anatol properties limited?

    • PT Express

      Sandi: I was told that Anatol Properties Limited is an overseas company that will launder money through your account and leave you holding the bag with the authorities. They interview you the They put a lot of work into it and it looks good on paper. Keep your good eye on them

      • HellTo TheNo

        so ur saying don’t go thru with them? is this a scam for real?

      • sandi

        This is totally a scam. looks good but beware. thanks PT Express

  • PTEXPRESS

    ANATOL PROPERTIES LIMITED – IS HIS A SCAM FOR OVER SEA MONEY TRANSFER THROUGH YOU OWN BANK ACCOUNT? HAS ANYON HEARD OF THIS COMPANY? ARE THEY FOR REAL…. THEY RECRUIT FROM CAREER BUILDER.

    • doghouse

      BE CAREFUL ITS A SCAM STAY AWAY

    • doghouse

      Yes it is .They use your account to wire money into it.
      Then ask you to wire the money overseas.then they clean out your bank account and your left holding the bag, .no money and
      maybe the police may contact about wiring money overseas.

  • Disgusted

    Hello Everyone,
    Please be careful. I have fell victim at one time or another and it sucks. But be strong. I have read everyone’s comments and there is a website that lets consumers know about companies that are scams. Website is called Ripoff Report. I found out about this website after I got scammed. Good luck

  • David

    Hi Suzanne,
    i don’t know if you will answer this, as this website is posted years ago. i currently work for a packaging company for forwarding stuff overseas. i don’t put any money into it, and i am in a “trial” period so i do not get paid yet. however they claim to be legit, and i haven’t paid a dime. they take care of all the postage. however i did get a package back saying that the postage i got was fraudulent. as a man who is in need of extra cash, should i just ignore this or have them send me another postage via email. i am not sure how to go about this… so if you still pay attention to this post please get back to m.

    • l hicks

      have you gotten paid yet??

      • doghouse

        It is not a job .They are using stolen credit cards to buy
        goods.
        be careful.

  • doghouse

    WATCH OUT FOR RESHIP SCAM SENDING ITEMS TO BE REPACKED.
    THEY NEVER PAY YOU AND YOUR THINGS THAT YOU SENT ARE PURCHASED BY STOLEN CREDIT CARDS . EVER ASK YOURSELF WHY CANNOT THEY SEND IT
    THEM OVERSEAS WITHOUT USING YOU. BE CAREFUL ALL WORK AT HOME BUSINESS ARE MOST LIKELY A SCAM.

  • doghouse

    ALSO WATCH FOR WIRING MONEY BY WESTERN UNION.ITS NOT A JOB.
    IT IS A SCAM.
    BE CAREFUL.

  • http://www.surveyjury.com/ Get Paid For Surveys

    We provides you survey panels that really pay. No scam or spam. Online surveys are no secret, so finding out trustworthy information about them shouldn’t be either. Survey Jury is the free, fast, easy, and fun way for you to get paid for your opinion.

  • DontBFOOLED

    I received an email from WCM Money Management. Supposed to be Melbourne based but I know these types of scam fell victim as well(hope I’m helping) A note to think about read how they write things understand grammar etc…a person named “Christina” introduces herself at the start of the letter, but a guy named “Robert” ended with ” Thank you, Robert hiring manager…” we are all in need of employment at times but I’ve been researching numerous scams to get advices from falling victim again so far in my honest opinion anything “work-at-home” related is a waste of time and puts you at risk, leaving you with the law on you and a harder situation then you were before. question them when they stop answering you, you know they got the hint. They need people to wash off their hands by using your identity and they leave you high and dry after receiving what they wanted. Little details can save you a ton of money and a clean record.ADVICE read the emails thoroughly!!!!!!DO NOT FALL FOR THESE CRIMINALS!!! overseas etc forget it.if you can’t sign anything by hand or ever meet someone it’s too good to be true.If you never broke a sweat working for that “money” promised it’s most likely not legit.real company hires hard workers.

  • Deb K.

    Has anyone heard of ShippingMate LLC? Does anyone know if they are really legit? I found this job on CareerBuilders and I contacted them. Position is for a shipping agent. I do not need to pay for anything, ever. I receive packages, open them up and inspect them. I have to take a picture of the merchandise then download that picture on the company’s database (which you have access to, to type your reports and check for assigned work). After I type up my report and download the picture, I submit it for approval. Soon afterwards I will receive a shipping label (prepaid by the company) and I seal the package back up, tape the shipping label on package and take it to the post office. I receive a shipping receipt from the post office, which I scan and download on the company’s database for proof I shipped the package. Pay is $2,200.00 monthly with a $50.00 bonus pay for each package you ship on time. Monthly payday isn’t up as of yet so I can not confirm if you actually get paid. As I was reading everyone’s comments, I saw one about a repackaging company and how that work from home person was arrested for helping a company send stolen goods. I have researched and researched this company and I could not find any negative thing about them. I am afraid it might end up being a scam of stolen goods (hoping this one is legit). I am a struggling single mom who can’t find a M-F full time day job, because I can not afford daycare. Does anyone know about this company? Thank you for your help.

    • Jim

      I have been working for shippingmate .biz for a little over 30 days payment was scheduled for July 2nd. I’m still waiting, tried to contact the company no response. My log in has been terminated. I have started receiving mail for people unknown. This is a scam. I have reported it to IC3

      • Deb K.

        Jim, I am sorry this happened to you too. Needless to say, I have not received payment either. I filed a complaint with the BBB and called the FBI. FBI agent referred me to IC3 to file a complaint, which I have done as well. I have started receiving mail, addressed to people unknown now too.

  • Ken Williams

    From: Emmanuel Poole

    Subj: Employment opportunity – 2518572062881

    Ostensibly to:[email protected] [NOT ME!]

    BODY:

    Hello ! The mail forwarding corporation is seeking
    shipping/receiving Manager.

    No enrollment fee. The average monthly income is $1500.

    Job Duties and responsibilities:

    - Must be able to work on flexible schedules – the
    position is home-based

    - Receive and mail incoming packages. Auditing incoming
    mail for damages.

    - Complete all paperwork in a timely and accurate manner.

    Qualifications:

    - Applicants must be mature – 21 years and older, able to
    work independently, prioritize the work in an accurate and efficient manner,
    permanent access to Internet.

    If ready to get started, please reply to : [email protected]
    with your resume and the home number where we can reach you.

    Please note: If you do not receive a call or email from
    our manager, your information will be kept in our database for future
    consideration.

    Thank you.

    — I don’t know why they would think that I would fall for this. I mean, it wasn’t even addressed to me! Doh!

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