• Christian Losciale

    Michael,
    I have eight tattoos and three piercings (ears and lip). I’m not the only one with gauges and tattoos. I know I’m fortunate to work for an employer that is an exception. I work in an office where most employees are under 35; tons of us are in our 20s.

    But we do our jobs and we do them well.

    As the generation ahead of us moves out of the work force in the next decade or two, and we move into employer positions, I expect fewer concerns about tattoos and piercings.

    Also, the Red Cross only requires a 12-month waiting period to donate blood after a tattoo if you got the tattoo in a state that does NOT regulate tattoo facilities. Of the 50 states, 32 states DO regulate the facilities. So in most states, you do NOT have to wait 12 months after you got a tattoo. As long as piercing instruments were sterile, you don’t have to wait 12 months to donate blood either. (http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood/eligibility-requirements/eligibility-criteria-topic)

    As for getting small tattoos, my biggest piece is on my back. Nobody will ever see that piece at the office. I have another large piece on my ribs. For men, wearing work—and even casual—attire makes it easy to cover locations for big tats: torsos, backs and upper legs.

    -Christian L. @ Smart Military Money

    • Mlewis

      Christian,
      I suspect your right that tats and piercings (up to a point) will become more accepted in the office as your generation ages. Of course, your generation could also become more conservative. I have a coupe of tats that I’ve always covered during work – the names of my wife and children – and I’ve never regretted getting them.
      I agree that stereotyping people based upon their appearance is often wrong, but I also question whether someone would want to take on the battle when there are so many more important ones to fight.
      Good luck with your career and thanks for the update on the Red Cross policy.

  • Christian Losciale

    Michael,
    I have eight tattoos and three piercings (ears and lip). I’m not the only one with gauges and tattoos. I know I’m fortunate to work for an employer that is an exception. I work in an office where most employees are under 35; tons of us are in our 20s.

    But we do our jobs and we do them well.

    As the generation ahead of us moves out of the work force in the next decade or two, and we move into employer positions, I expect fewer concerns about tattoos and piercings.

    Also, the Red Cross only requires a 12-month waiting period to donate blood after a tattoo if you got the tattoo in a state that does NOT regulate tattoo facilities. Of the 50 states, 32 states DO regulate the facilities. So in most states, you do NOT have to wait 12 months after you got a tattoo. As long as piercing instruments were sterile, you don’t have to wait 12 months to donate blood either. (http://www.redcrossblood.org/donating-blood/eligibility-requirements/eligibility-criteria-topic)

    As for getting small tattoos, my biggest piece is on my back. Nobody will ever see that piece at the office. I have another large piece on my ribs. For men, wearing work—and even casual—attire makes it easy to cover locations for big tats: torsos, backs and upper legs.

    -Christian L. @ Smart Military Money

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